[rank_math_breadcrumb]
logo-v-light

Our Service

CHAR

In this comprehensive guide, we will explore the CHAR function in Excel, which is used to convert a numeric value into its corresponding character based on the character set being used. This function is particularly useful when working with special characters or when you need to convert a series of numeric values into a text string. We will cover the syntax of the CHAR function, provide examples of its use, share tips and tricks, discuss common mistakes, troubleshoot issues, and introduce related formulae.

CHAR Syntax

The syntax for the CHAR function in Excel is quite simple, requiring only one argument:

=CHAR(number)

Where number is the numeric value you want to convert into a character. The CHAR function uses the ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) character set for numbers between 1 and 127, and the ANSI character set for numbers between 128 and 255.

CHAR Examples

Let’s look at some examples of how the CHAR function can be used in Excel:

Example 1: Basic usage

Suppose you want to convert the number 65 into its corresponding character. You would use the following formula:

=CHAR(65)

This formula would return the character “A”, as 65 corresponds to the uppercase letter “A” in the ASCII character set.

Example 2: Special characters

If you want to insert a line break in a cell, you can use the CHAR function with the number 10, which represents a line break in the ASCII character set:

=”This is line 1″ & CHAR(10) & “This is line 2”

This formula would display the text “This is line 1” followed by a line break and then “This is line 2” in the same cell.

Example 3: Combining CHAR with other functions

You can also use the CHAR function in combination with other functions. For example, you can use the RANDBETWEEN function to generate a random uppercase letter:

=CHAR(RANDBETWEEN(65, 90))

This formula would return a random uppercase letter between “A” and “Z”.

CHAR Tips & Tricks

Here are some tips and tricks to help you get the most out of the CHAR function in Excel:

Tip 1: Remember the character sets

Keep in mind that the CHAR function uses the ASCII character set for numbers between 1 and 127, and the ANSI character set for numbers between 128 and 255. This can be helpful when working with special characters or symbols.

Tip 2: Use CHAR for non-printable characters

The CHAR function can be used to insert non-printable characters, such as line breaks or tabs, into a cell. For example, you can use CHAR(9) to insert a tab character or CHAR(10) to insert a line break.

Common Mistakes When Using CHAR

There are a few common mistakes that users make when using the CHAR function in Excel:

Mistake 1: Using an invalid number

The CHAR function only accepts numbers between 1 and 255. If you try to use a number outside of this range, you will receive a #VALUE! error.

Mistake 2: Forgetting the character set

It’s important to remember that the CHAR function uses the ASCII character set for numbers between 1 and 127, and the ANSI character set for numbers between 128 and 255. If you’re trying to convert a number into a specific character, make sure you’re using the correct character set.

Why Isn’t My CHAR Function Working?

If your CHAR function isn’t working as expected, there are a few possible reasons:

Reason 1: Invalid number

As mentioned earlier, the CHAR function only accepts numbers between 1 and 255. If you’re using a number outside of this range, you will receive a #VALUE! error. Make sure you’re using a valid number within the accepted range.

Reason 2: Incorrect character set

If you’re trying to convert a number into a specific character but aren’t getting the expected result, it’s possible that you’re using the wrong character set. Remember that the CHAR function uses the ASCII character set for numbers between 1 and 127, and the ANSI character set for numbers between 128 and 255.

CHAR: Related Formulae

Here are some related formulae that you might find useful when working with the CHAR function in Excel:

1. CODE

The CODE function is the inverse of the CHAR function. It returns the numeric value of the first character in a text string. For example:

=CODE(“A”)

This formula would return the number 65, which is the ASCII value of the uppercase letter “A”.

2. CONCATENATE / CONCAT

The CONCATENATE (or CONCAT in Excel 2016 and later) function is used to join multiple text strings together. You can use this function in combination with the CHAR function to create custom text strings with special characters. For example:

=CONCATENATE(“Hello”, CHAR(33))

This formula would return the text “Hello!”, with the exclamation mark added using the CHAR function.

3. LEFT, MID, and RIGHT

These functions are used to extract specific characters from a text string. You can use them in combination with the CHAR function to manipulate text strings containing special characters. For example:

=MID(“Hello” & CHAR(33), 2, 3)

This formula would return the text “ell”, which are the second, third, and fourth characters of the text string “Hello!”.

4. SUBSTITUTE

The SUBSTITUTE function is used to replace specific characters in a text string with other characters. You can use this function in combination with the CHAR function to replace special characters in a text string. For example:

=SUBSTITUTE(“Hello” & CHAR(33), CHAR(33), “?”)

This formula would return the text “Hello?”, with the exclamation mark replaced by a question mark.

5. CLEAN

The CLEAN function is used to remove non-printable characters from a text string. If you have a text string containing special characters added using the CHAR function, you can use the CLEAN function to remove them. For example:

=CLEAN(“Hello” & CHAR(10) & “World”)

This formula would return the text “HelloWorld”, with the line break character removed.

Related

Did you find this article useful?

Share it with your friends or colleagues

About Aepoch Advisors

We are a boutique accounting and consulting firm servicing international businesses operating in China. We offers book keeping and business advisory service. We also help our clients select and implement SAAS business applications
 
Cloud technology significantly reduces cost foreign companies traditionally spent on tax compliance and ERP systems. Our cloud professionals can help with streamlining your management and controling structure, as well as advising you on how to reduce risks and maximize profits with software purposely built for Chinese business. Contact us today to learn more about our services.