[rank_math_breadcrumb]
logo-v-light

Our Service

STOCKHISTORY

In this comprehensive guide, we will explore the STOCKHISTORY function in Excel, which allows users to retrieve historical stock prices and other financial data for various assets. This function is particularly useful for investors, financial analysts, and anyone interested in tracking the performance of stocks, ETFs, and other financial instruments over time. We will cover the syntax of the function, provide examples of its use, share tips and tricks, discuss common mistakes, and explore related formulae.

STOCKHISTORY Syntax

The STOCKHISTORY function in Excel has the following syntax:

STOCKHISTORY(stock, start_date, [end_date], [interval], [headers], [property0], [property1], [property2], [property3], [property4], [property5])

Here’s a breakdown of the arguments:

  1. stock: The stock, ETF, or other financial instrument for which you want to retrieve historical data. This can be a ticker symbol, an ISIN, or a FIGI.
  2. start_date: The start date for the historical data, entered as a date or a cell reference containing a date.
  3. [end_date] (optional): The end date for the historical data. If omitted, Excel will return data for the start_date only.
  4. [interval] (optional): The interval for the historical data, entered as a number. The default is 0 (daily). Other options are 1 (weekly), 2 (monthly), 3 (quarterly), and 4 (yearly).
  5. [headers] (optional): A boolean value (TRUE or FALSE) that specifies whether to include headers in the output. The default is TRUE.
  6. [property0] to [property5] (optional): Up to six additional properties to include in the output, entered as numbers. Available properties are 0 (date), 1 (closing price), 2 (open price), 3 (high price), 4 (low price), and 5 (volume).

STOCKHISTORY Examples

Let’s look at some examples of how to use the STOCKHISTORY function in Excel:

  1. Basic example: To retrieve the closing price of Microsoft (MSFT) stock for a specific date, you can use the following formula:

    =STOCKHISTORY(“MSFT”, “2021-01-01”)

    This will return the closing price of MSFT on January 1, 2021.

  2. Specifying an end date: To retrieve the closing prices of MSFT stock for a date range, you can use the following formula:

    =STOCKHISTORY(“MSFT”, “2021-01-01”, “2021-01-31”)

    This will return the daily closing prices of MSFT for January 2021.

  3. Changing the interval: To retrieve the monthly closing prices of MSFT stock for a date range, you can use the following formula:

    =STOCKHISTORY(“MSFT”, “2021-01-01”, “2021-12-31”, 2)

    This will return the monthly closing prices of MSFT for the year 2021.

  4. Adding additional properties: To retrieve the date, closing price, and volume of MSFT stock for a date range, you can use the following formula:

    =STOCKHISTORY(“MSFT”, “2021-01-01”, “2021-01-31”, 0, TRUE, 0, 1, 5)

    This will return the date, closing price, and volume of MSFT for January 2021.

STOCKHISTORY Tips & Tricks

Here are some tips and tricks to help you get the most out of the STOCKHISTORY function in Excel:

  1. Use cell references for stock symbols and dates to make your formulas more dynamic and easier to update.
  2. Combine the STOCKHISTORY function with other Excel functions, such as AVERAGE, MAX, and MIN, to perform calculations on the historical data.
  3. Use conditional formatting to highlight specific data points, such as the highest or lowest closing prices in a given date range.
  4. Experiment with different intervals and properties to customize the output to your specific needs.

Common Mistakes When Using STOCKHISTORY

Here are some common mistakes to avoid when using the STOCKHISTORY function in Excel:

  1. Using an incorrect or outdated stock symbol. Make sure to double-check the stock symbol before using it in the formula.
  2. Entering dates in an incorrect format. Excel requires dates to be entered in the format “yyyy-mm-dd”.
  3. Using an invalid interval or property value. Make sure to use the correct numerical values for intervals and properties, as described in the syntax section.
  4. Not providing enough space for the output. The STOCKHISTORY function returns an array, so make sure to select enough cells to accommodate the output before entering the formula.

Why Isn’t My STOCKHISTORY Working?

If your STOCKHISTORY function isn’t working, consider the following troubleshooting steps:

  1. Check your internet connection, as the STOCKHISTORY function requires an active internet connection to retrieve data.
  2. Ensure that you are using a supported version of Excel. The STOCKHISTORY function is only available in Excel for Microsoft 365 and Excel for the web.
  3. Review your formula for any syntax errors, such as incorrect stock symbols, dates, intervals, or property values.
  4. Make sure you have selected enough cells to accommodate the output of the function.

STOCKHISTORY: Related Formulae

Here are some related Excel functions that can be used in conjunction with the STOCKHISTORY function:

  1. WEBSERVICE: This function allows you to retrieve data from a web service by providing a URL. It can be used to access financial data from other sources if the STOCKHISTORY function does not meet your needs.
  2. FILTER: This function can be used to filter the output of the STOCKHISTORY function based on specific criteria, such as a minimum or maximum closing price.
  3. XLOOKUP: This function can be used to look up and return values from the output of the STOCKHISTORY function, such as the closing price for a specific date.
  4. AGGREGATE: This function can be used to perform calculations on the output of the STOCKHISTORY function, such as the average closing price or the highest volume.
  5. TEXTJOIN: This function can be used to concatenate the output of the STOCKHISTORY function into a single cell, separated by a specified delimiter.

By mastering the STOCKHISTORY function and its related functions, you can unlock powerful financial analysis capabilities in Excel, helping you make more informed investment decisions and track the performance of your portfolio over time.

Related

Did you find this article useful?

Share it with your friends or colleagues

About Aepoch Advisors

We are a boutique accounting and consulting firm servicing international businesses operating in China. We offers book keeping and business advisory service. We also help our clients select and implement SAAS business applications
 
Cloud technology significantly reduces cost foreign companies traditionally spent on tax compliance and ERP systems. Our cloud professionals can help with streamlining your management and controling structure, as well as advising you on how to reduce risks and maximize profits with software purposely built for Chinese business. Contact us today to learn more about our services.